Stations, by Derek Lind (New Zealand)

In 1994, an editor let me review this album for his Christian magazine “Reality”. I hustled him to review The Winans “All Out” but I did not succeed. He really wanted someone to review Derek Lind’s Stations album, so gave me the job. I was not that enthusiastic to do it. However, I pretty much liked Lind’s previous album Slippery Ground so had a connection. Lind is known in Christian circles for his unapologetic content.

Reviewed by Peter Veugelaers. 1994.

When leading New Zealand ‘underground’ artist Derek Lind performed at last January’s Parachute Music Festival he gave us a taste of his not-yet released new album. That Saturday night at the festival the atmosphere was electric, charge with anticipation—an atmosphere reflected in this album, which bubbles with poetic honesty.

As with his previous releases, Stations has a distinctly New Zealand flavour. Here that flavour comes through most strongly in “My Grandfather,” Derek’s engaging recollection of his personal heritage, marvellously captured, while “Ukulele” also embraces his Rarotongan wife Ra’s family heritage.

Yet Lind’s vision is international too. His travels with Tear Fund around parts of Asia have resulted in a number of powerful, poignant songs throughout the years.

Most of this continent’s inhabitants live with violence, oppression and poverty, making Derek’s lifestyle, as he says on the album jacket, seem “petty” and very comfortable. This is indicated in the beautiful song “Nothing Looks The Same,” written in Manila: “I get to fly away/You get to stay”—a powerful reminder of our privileged global position which digs deep at the soul. What could I do in their situation? Can I help them?

The song “Lightening Strike” adopts another familiar Lind line: the angry, voice-in-the-wilderness prophetic denunciation of the American Christian music industry, of people living double lives. Yet this voice is heard less often on “Stations”, which opts by and large for a quieter, more intimate atmosphere, more akin to the song “Picture” on his Slippery Ground album.

In “Ukulele” Derek sings, “This was going to be a picture, but it turned into a song.” Derek Lind, once an art teacher himself, paints a number of deftly sketched, sharply realized pictures on this album, portraying real life situations in a thoughtful, stimulating and challenging way.

A very accessible album with warmth, backbone and integrity.

Reviewed for Reality magazine.

Image/projection

Image control and public relations or people made in the image of God? God doesn’t need image control or to manage his own public relations. I just don’t like using that business/marketing terminology to God! It is not true of God!

– Pete’s quotes

Once published, always published?

Once Saved, Always Saved?: A Study in Perseverance and Inheritance by David Pawson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


This 1996 book explores the “once saved, always saved” doctrine. The general belief of once saved always saved is that when someone believes in Jesus, they can be assured of going to heaven and not hell. They cannot lose their salvation even if they lose their faith. Author of the book David Pawson says many evangelicals accept this view, but within that there is a spectrum of belief.

Pawson explains in the book that once saved always saved (from hell) has its roots in the patristic period but is not what the early church taught. The focus there was more on salvation from sin.

From the early church, to the church fathers, through the Middle Ages, and into the church reformation, to the revivals of the 18th century, Pawson has obviously plied careful research skills to provide an historical overview of the topic. As well, there are philosophical points of interest and practical concerns related to the topic, and two appendices. The last appendix is about the disciple Judas, who betrayed Jesus. Through all this, Pawson makes comments and critiques.

Pawson builds a clear and convincing case against once saved always saved. It is as if an objective and clear mind considered the biblical evidence, as it is, to come to his conclusion. He does provide a most logical, sound thesis and makes weak the arguments for once saved always saved.

He writes thoughtfully and readably, dispels myths and pet sayings, and relates the topic back to himself. A weakness against his case may be that the author has said elsewhere that he fears going to hell (in Explaining End Times), but this may not be a weakness, either. He makes a sobering point that Jesus’ teaching about hell was originally addressed to believers.

However, teaching about hell in modern times has often been directed at non-Christians.
The original, apostolic outreach message was “Repent, believe and be baptized” and not hell, fire, and brimstone nor “once saved, always saved”, explains Pawson.

It is explained in the book well why putting one’s faith in Jesus is a continuing, ongoing thing which means not giving up and being holy because “without holiness no one will see Lord”. This is rather than assuming I’ll be all right and flag the faith.

David Pawson was a prominent Bible teacher and author of numerous books unpacking themes in the Bible and the contemporary evangelical church. He taught many church leaders in his itinerant ministry.

The author of the book suspects that only serous Bible students will see the book through to the end, but this in no way diminishes his case, a case which is rock solid. Once Saved, Always Saved? A Study in Perseverance and Inheritance comes highly recommended.
168 pages, Published 1996, Publisher Hodder and Stoughton.



View all my reviews

Winter surprise

Photo by Kristin Vogt on Pexels.com

Memory lane: Circa, 2017. Judson Press sent me a copy of the winter issue of The Secret Place which has one of my devotions in it. Yet, whatever the season, be it winter or summer, I’m pleased my article’s there, winter or summer. But it will be read in the North American winter. Why do I attract the North American winter? Surprise!