Heat (1995)

I saw this film with mates, of course. Later I reviewed it, sent it off, and they chose to publish it. Pretty much my review summed up my view in a nutshell. Although there was no exploration of theme as a potential Christian review would do, I mentioned things that came more to the fore of my writing later on, the violence for instance. In the review, I mentioned the violence in the movie but did not condemn it for the violent scenes. Maybe Christian reviewers should always come down harder on violence, but my impression at the time was less focused on that manner of view. This was a time of pure film appreciation. My mates called this type of film action.

An intense, sometimes bloody, and inherent psychological thriller that stars Al Pacino and Robert De Niro on screen together.

Heat’s editing, cinematography and Dolby digital sound make for impressive viewing with star performances. The violence depicting robberies are brutal but the technical aspects of these scenes are excellent.

Centering on Vincent’s (Pacino) tracking down of a gangster, Neil (De Niro) it is an unpredictable suspense film with intrigue near its core.

Reviewed by Peter Veugelaers 1996, GiveWay Magazine.

True

A writer has an approach to their work. For me, this is being conducive to my readers. I think this is what every writer wants. To sound conducive and not banging on about something. This is how I approached reviewing films. To sound conducive. Films were not my flavor of the month though But I started writing with something I knew about, as in the 1980’s, before the year 1990, I was an avid moviegoer and knew them all pretty well. In 1990, my views of movies changed.

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Who’s who

The films directed by Peter Brook, a British theatre as well as film director, now in his nineties, are challenging to find for streaming or on demand in my vicinity. His first feature film was in 1953, The Beggar’s Opera, so its age may explain its evasiveness in the market. He followed this by several art house films which seemed quite fascinating as subjects, The Lord of the Flies the best known, which can be easily accessed where I am. The other film I can find of his is Meetings with Remarkable Men (1979). Not that I had been looking for Peter Brook films to watch, but I happened to read about the film first and thought it interesting and even relatable so looked him up and discovered more.

Boxes

Reducing things to boxes comes in different forms. Could it be when one says she has a “God moment” at the movies? Or might have been felt by the Zavier Jones whoever that is, as well. It may seem when people talk about their “God moments” at the movies they may be reducing things to a box. I think, when it comes to things like art and pictures like films, if one says they get God in it, isn’t this a bit of mystery. I would be afraid to say it was God because what if it really isn’t and is just our mind. God is so greater than our minds.